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Sarge and I

Sarge and I

I spent a lot of time at my grandparent’s home near Nevada, Mo during the turbulent years of WW II. Dad was first stationed in Fort Leavenworth, then Oregon. He spent a brief time in Waynesville before he shipped out for France, then Germany with the Army’s 70th Division. He arrived on the battlefield just after the Battle of the Bulge, 1944 at age 34. Since Mom held the position of store manager for the Edmiston’s Department Store in Fort…

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Life in Oregon in WW II

Life in Oregon in WW II

We became a family again when Mom and I took a train from Kansas City to Albany, Oregon. We started out in a car with a couple of other Army wives, but suffered a blowout near Wichita. With no ration stamps for tires we had to return home and wait for train tickets. Dad was stationed at Camp Adair near Albany. We were able to stay in various apartments in the region in 1943 and into 1944 until Dad received…

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Early Years

Early Years

My mom and I moved several times during WW II while Dad was in the Army. He’d already served three years in the 30s, but Uncle Sam drafted him soon after I was born in the early 40s. In order to be near him, we moved to Albany, Oregon because he was stationed at Camp Adair with the 70th Division. He trained troops there for the south Pacific. Our next move was to Fort Leonard Wood, near Waynesville, Missouri. After a…

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Four Generations that Built America

Four Generations that Built America

This picture contains three of the people I’ve written about in my historical fiction books. On the left is Sanford Deering the main character of The Late Sooner who went into the Oklahoma Territory in the first land run in 1889. The lady is Nora, The Late Sooner’s Daughter, who came back to Missouri when she was nine. The child is my father, Henry, of Hard Times in the Heartland who served in WW II. The old gentleman on the right is Henry Greenup…

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Early Beginnings

Early Beginnings

A hundred and sixteen years ago, little boys wore dresses until they were about two years old. Here is a picture of my dad, Henry, at six months. In his lifetime he lived through WW I, the Roaring 20s, The Depression, WW II, the Korean War and The Vietnam War. At age ten, a crop-duster pilot flew into a nearby field near my dad’s small town and said he would take one person for a ride. Everyone chipped in to…

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The First Time

The First Time

Dad did two hitches in the Army. One from 1934-37. Another one from 1943-45. This picture is from the first taken in Fort Leavenworth, I think. The first time was voluntary. The second mandatory. Do you have many relatives who saw service in WW II? To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

German Coin Purse

German Coin Purse

When U.S. soldiers came home from WW II they were not permitted to carry a lot of plunder.  Very few stores were in operation by the time the men came home. I don’ t really know where Dad got this little purse. It was his gift to me from Germany. It’s only about three inches long. If only objects could talk! Do you have an object from your past that begs an explanation?   To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Missing Daddy

Missing Daddy

For the first few years, my dad was in and out of my life. The day after I was born, he received a notice from the draft board that he had been reclassified from 4A to 1A. He had already served three years in the Army during the 30s. After eight months the lottery draw of the draft board caught up with him in July of 1943. He was off to Fort Leavenworth for his physical on July 13 with…

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Train Stations–WW II

Train Stations–WW II

    The Ottawa, Kansas train station still stands, although today it serves as a museum. Sitting forty-five miles southwest of Kansas City, it has seen its share of departures and homecomings. On a late October night, 1945, my dad arrived from his mandatory trip of almost a year in France and Germany at the request of the U.S. Army. Thus his commitment ended from his draft notice delivered to him twenty-seven months earlier. After the war, he went on…

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WW II Draft Notice

WW II Draft Notice

You’d think if you’d voluntarily served in the Army for three years, you wouldn’t be called again, right? Read this excerpt from “Hard Times in the Heartland”.  The next Monday evening Henry picked out the mail from the box and thumbed through it while he ate some leftover turkey hash before heading to the hospital. One letter was from the Selective Service Agency. He tore it open. Inside was a card on which was written: Notice of Reclassification Henry Sanford…

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