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Sarge and I

Sarge and I

I spent a lot of time at my grandparent’s home near Nevada, Mo during the turbulent years of WW II. Dad was first stationed in Fort Leavenworth, then Oregon. He spent a brief time in Waynesville before he shipped out for France, then Germany with the Army’s 70th Division. He arrived on the battlefield just after the Battle of the Bulge, 1944 at age 34.

Since Mom held the position of store manager for the Edmiston’s Department Store in Fort Scott and Ottawa, KS, I was shuffled back and forth to Grandma’s often.

One of my companions was a collie named Sarge. When I went outside, he was always beside me. Here we are in Grandma’s side yard. I write about these years in Hard Times in the Heartland. Hard to believe this was over 70 years ago!

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Life in Oregon in WW II

Life in Oregon in WW II

We became a family again when Mom and I took a train from Kansas City to Albany, Oregon. We started out in a car with a couple of other Army wives, but suffered a blowout near Wichita. With no ration stamps for tires we had to return home and wait for train tickets.

Dad was stationed at Camp Adair near Albany. We were able to stay in various apartments in the region in 1943 and into 1944 until Dad received orders to relocate to Fort Leonard Wood in central Missouri. His next stop was France.

We didn’t see him again for nearly a year while he and his 70th Division fought their way into Germany.

Mom took this picture in the summer of 1943 in Albany.

To read more about this time, check out Hard Times in the Heartland on Amazon.com.

 

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4I

One Stop in WW II

One Stop in WW II

The last stop in our journeys to follow my dad in the States during WW II was in Waynesville, MO. He was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood before the Army shipped the 70th Division to France. By then I was twenty months old and had already lived in Kansas, Oregon, and Missouri.

My folks called this place “El Rancho.” We lived here with other couples because there was such a shortage of housing. Soon after this picture, Dad left to arrive in Europe just in time to pick up bodies after the Battle of the Bulge. That was the coldest winter Europe had had in fifty years.

This is one of the pictures he carried with him on the battlefield.

Did you move around a lot as a child?

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Early Years

Early Years

My mom and I moved several times during WW II while Dad was in the Army. He’d already served three years in the 30s, but Uncle Sam drafted him soon after I was born in the early 40s.

In order to be near him, we moved to Albany, Oregon because he was stationed at Camp Adair with the 70th Division. He trained troops there for the south Pacific.

Our next move was to Fort Leonard Wood, near Waynesville, Missouri. After a few months, Mom and I moved back to Fort Scott where we began, while Dad received orders to France in 1944 and later into Germany.

I think Mom took this picture when we lived in Oregon. Our first house there was a basement divided into three rooms. I slept in a dresser drawer until Mom could locate a bed.

After we returned to Fort Scott, I spent a lot of time with my grandparents in southwest Missouri on a farm. Good babysitters were hard to come by in those days.

I cover these events in my latest novel, Hard Times in the Heartland available on Amazon in paperback and e-reader.

What memories of your young years do you recall?

 

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4