Browsed by
Category: WW II

Sarge and I

Sarge and I

I spent a lot of time at my grandparent’s home near Nevada, Mo during the turbulent years of WW II. Dad was first stationed in Fort Leavenworth, then Oregon. He spent a brief time in Waynesville before he shipped out for France, then Germany with the Army’s 70th Division. He arrived on the battlefield just after the Battle of the Bulge, 1944 at age 34. Since Mom held the position of store manager for the Edmiston’s Department Store in Fort…

Read More Read More

Life in Oregon in WW II

Life in Oregon in WW II

We became a family again when Mom and I took a train from Kansas City to Albany, Oregon. We started out in a car with a couple of other Army wives, but suffered a blowout near Wichita. With no ration stamps for tires we had to return home and wait for train tickets. Dad was stationed at Camp Adair near Albany. We were able to stay in various apartments in the region in 1943 and into 1944 until Dad received…

Read More Read More

One Stop in WW II

One Stop in WW II

The last stop in our journeys to follow my dad in the States during WW II was in Waynesville, MO. He was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood before the Army shipped the 70th Division to France. By then I was twenty months old and had already lived in Kansas, Oregon, and Missouri. My folks called this place “El Rancho.” We lived here with other couples because there was such a shortage of housing. Soon after this picture, Dad left to…

Read More Read More

Early Years

Early Years

My mom and I moved several times during WW II while Dad was in the Army. He’d already served three years in the 30s, but Uncle Sam drafted him soon after I was born in the early 40s. In order to be near him, we moved to Albany, Oregon because he was stationed at Camp Adair with the 70th Division. He trained troops there for the south Pacific. Our next move was to Fort Leonard Wood, near Waynesville, Missouri. After a…

Read More Read More

Early Beginnings

Early Beginnings

A hundred and sixteen years ago, little boys wore dresses until they were about two years old. Here is a picture of my dad, Henry, at six months. In his lifetime he lived through WW I, the Roaring 20s, The Depression, WW II, the Korean War and The Vietnam War. At age ten, a crop-duster pilot flew into a nearby field near my dad’s small town and said he would take one person for a ride. Everyone chipped in to…

Read More Read More

The First Time

The First Time

Dad did two hitches in the Army. One from 1934-37. Another one from 1943-45. This picture is from the first taken in Fort Leavenworth, I think. The first time was voluntary. The second mandatory. Do you have many relatives who saw service in WW II? To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

German Coin Purse

German Coin Purse

When U.S. soldiers came home from WW II they were not permitted to carry a lot of plunder.  Very few stores were in operation by the time the men came home. I don’ t really know where Dad got this little purse. It was his gift to me from Germany. It’s only about three inches long. If only objects could talk! Do you have an object from your past that begs an explanation?   To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Coming Home

Coming Home

After WW II in Europe, every soldier had one thing on their mind–getting home. That proved to be a monumental task with 2.4 million troops to get back across the pond. The Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth carried many of them. In order to get as many men home as soon as possible, they packed them like sardines. The troops had to take shifts in the bunks. It took between 5 to 10 days to make the trip.  Many wives, in…

Read More Read More

Train Stations–WW II

Train Stations–WW II

    The Ottawa, Kansas train station still stands, although today it serves as a museum. Sitting forty-five miles southwest of Kansas City, it has seen its share of departures and homecomings. On a late October night, 1945, my dad arrived from his mandatory trip of almost a year in France and Germany at the request of the U.S. Army. Thus his commitment ended from his draft notice delivered to him twenty-seven months earlier. After the war, he went on…

Read More Read More

Mail in WW II

Mail in WW II

With today’s Skype, IMs, and e-mails, communication with those in battle zones it’s instantaneous. Not so in WW II. Letters sometimes took four weeks to reach their intended target. A GIs letter was first censored to make sure the author didn’t divulge any information as to where they were in case the letter fell into enemy hands. The 8 1/2″ x 11″ letter was then photographed and shrunk to 4″ x 5″ in order to save space on planes. The soldier…

Read More Read More

%d bloggers like this: