Browsed by
Category: WW II

Sarge and I

Sarge and I

I spent a lot of time at my grandparent’s home near Nevada, Mo during the turbulent years of WW II. Dad was first stationed in Fort Leavenworth, then Oregon. He spent a brief time in Waynesville before he shipped out for France, then Germany with the Army’s 70th Division. He arrived on the battlefield just after the Battle of the Bulge, 1944 at age 34.

Since Mom held the position of store manager for the Edmiston’s Department Store in Fort Scott and Ottawa, KS, I was shuffled back and forth to Grandma’s often.

One of my companions was a collie named Sarge. When I went outside, he was always beside me. Here we are in Grandma’s side yard. I write about these years in Hard Times in the Heartland. Hard to believe this was over 70 years ago!

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Life in Oregon in WW II

Life in Oregon in WW II

We became a family again when Mom and I took a train from Kansas City to Albany, Oregon. We started out in a car with a couple of other Army wives, but suffered a blowout near Wichita. With no ration stamps for tires we had to return home and wait for train tickets.

Dad was stationed at Camp Adair near Albany. We were able to stay in various apartments in the region in 1943 and into 1944 until Dad received orders to relocate to Fort Leonard Wood in central Missouri. His next stop was France.

We didn’t see him again for nearly a year while he and his 70th Division fought their way into Germany.

Mom took this picture in the summer of 1943 in Albany.

To read more about this time, check out Hard Times in the Heartland on Amazon.com.

 

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4I

One Stop in WW II

One Stop in WW II

The last stop in our journeys to follow my dad in the States during WW II was in Waynesville, MO. He was stationed at Fort Leonard Wood before the Army shipped the 70th Division to France. By then I was twenty months old and had already lived in Kansas, Oregon, and Missouri.

My folks called this place “El Rancho.” We lived here with other couples because there was such a shortage of housing. Soon after this picture, Dad left to arrive in Europe just in time to pick up bodies after the Battle of the Bulge. That was the coldest winter Europe had had in fifty years.

This is one of the pictures he carried with him on the battlefield.

Did you move around a lot as a child?

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Early Years

Early Years

My mom and I moved several times during WW II while Dad was in the Army. He’d already served three years in the 30s, but Uncle Sam drafted him soon after I was born in the early 40s.

In order to be near him, we moved to Albany, Oregon because he was stationed at Camp Adair with the 70th Division. He trained troops there for the south Pacific.

Our next move was to Fort Leonard Wood, near Waynesville, Missouri. After a few months, Mom and I moved back to Fort Scott where we began, while Dad received orders to France in 1944 and later into Germany.

I think Mom took this picture when we lived in Oregon. Our first house there was a basement divided into three rooms. I slept in a dresser drawer until Mom could locate a bed.

After we returned to Fort Scott, I spent a lot of time with my grandparents in southwest Missouri on a farm. Good babysitters were hard to come by in those days.

I cover these events in my latest novel, Hard Times in the Heartland available on Amazon in paperback and e-reader.

What memories of your young years do you recall?

 

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Early Beginnings

Early Beginnings

Henry Freeman 6 mo.2

A hundred and sixteen years ago, little boys wore dresses until they were about two years old. Here is a picture of my dad, Henry, at six months.

In his lifetime he lived through WW I, the Roaring 20s, The Depression, WW II, the Korean War and The Vietnam War.

At age ten, a crop-duster pilot flew into a nearby field near my dad’s small town and said he would take one person for a ride. Everyone chipped in to buy a chance. My dad won the lottery. That one ride started him on a lifetime love of flying. When he was 60, he obtained his commercial pilot license. At the time, he was the oldest person in Kansas to ever receive this license. He never actually flew a commercial flight–it was just one of his long-term goals.

I remember the day the U.S. landed on the moon. My husband and I and our children were in the Ozarks with my folks. As my dad drove he kept saying, “I just can’t believe we’ve actually landed on the moon!” Had he been younger, I’m sure he would have been in line to apply to be an astronaut.

A lot has changed in 116 years. At least little boys don’t have to wear dresses anymore!

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

German Coin Purse

German Coin Purse

When U.S. soldiers came home from WW II they were not permitted to carry a lot of plunder.  Very few stores were in operation by the time the men came home.

I don’ t really know where Dad got this little purse. It was his gift to me from Germany. It’s only about three inches long. If only objects could talk!

Do you have an object from your past that begs an explanation?

 

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4

Coming Home

Coming Home

queen-eliz-ww-iiAfter WW II in Europe, every soldier had one thing on their mind–getting home. That proved to be a monumental task with 2.4 million troops to get back across the pond. The Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth carried many of them. In order to get as many men home as soon as possible, they packed them like sardines. The troops had to take shifts in the bunks. It took between 5 to 10 days to make the trip. 

Many wives, in anticipation of their guy’s arrival, went to New York only to find no place to stay. 

When the soldiers arrived in New York, many didn’t have the money to make a call home or to send a telegram. They merely showed up in their hometown. 

At one point, the Longshoremen at the New York harbor went on strike, claiming the loads of the troop ships too heavy, therefore, they walked off the job. 

This is a picture of The Queen Elizabeth packed with about 15,000 men anxious to see their loved ones before Thanksgiving 1945.

To see my books visit http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B007F5H0H4
See all my blogs under the Blog tab at <a href=”http://www.sallyjadlow.com” target=”_blank”>SallyJadlow.com</a>

Train Stations–WW II

Train Stations–WW II

 

 

The Ottawa, Kansas train station still stands, although today it serves as a museum. Sitting forty-five miles southwest of Kansas City, it has seen its share of departures and homecomings.

On a late October night, 1945, my dad arrived from his mandatory trip of almost a year in France and Germany at the request of the U.S. Army. Thus his commitment ended from his draft notice delivered to him twenty-seven months earlier.

After the war, he went on to establish a partnership with his brother-in-law in an Oldsmobile dealership, a motel, and an asphalt paving company. Their partnership lasted for over 40 years.

The two of them died within two weeks of one another, almost forty years after they both came back from WW II in the European Theatre.

My other blogs:

 https://familyfavoritesfromtheheartland.wordpress.com/ and https://godslittlemiraclebook.wordpress.com

Mail in WW II

Mail in WW II

resized_20161015_153416

With today’s Skype, IMs, and e-mails, communication with those in battle zones it’s instantaneous. Not so in WW II. Letters sometimes took four weeks to reach their intended target.

A GIs letter was first censored to make sure the author didn’t divulge any information as to where they were in case the letter fell into enemy hands. The 8 1/2″ x 11″ letter was then photographed and shrunk to 4″ x 5″ in order to save space on planes. The soldier could only write one page. This mail was called V-Mail (the V standing for victory).

Henry felt one page was entirely too short. “I just get wound up and I’ve run out of paper.” He preferred air mail. That only took about one to two weeks and cost six cents a letter for postage. 

My other blogs: 

https://familyfavoritesfromtheheartland.wordpress.com/ and https://godslittlemiraclebook.wordpress.com